What is Either-or Fallacy? Explained With Real Life Examples

 

example of logical fallacy in literature

Slippery Slope Examples. Slippery Slope is a specific type of logical fallacy.A logical fallacy is a flawed argument. There are many different types of logical fallacy. Slippery slope is one example of a fallacy. It is an argument that suggests taking a minor action will . In reasoning to argue a claim, a fallacy is reasoning that is evaluated as logically incorrect and that undermines the logical validity of the argument and permits its recognition as requiread-w.galess of their soundness, all registers and manners of speech can demonstrate fallacies. Because of their variety of structure and application, fallacies are challenging to classify so as to satisfy. Feb 24,  · The either-or fallacy, also known as false dilemma or false dichotomy, is a type of fallacy (logically false belief) wherein a said situation has only a limited number of alternatives. But in reality, it can have more. PsycholoGenie, in this post, explains the concept of either-or fallacy, and also cites some examples to make you understand it requiread-w.ga: Vibhav Gaonkar.


Fallacy - Examples and Definition of Fallacy


In reasoning to argue a claim, a fallacy is reasoning that is evaluated as logically incorrect and that undermines the logical validity of the argument and permits its recognition as unsound. Regardless of their soundness, all registers and manners of speech can demonstrate fallacies. Because of their variety of structure and application, fallacies are challenging to classify so as to satisfy all practitioners. Fallacies can be classified strictly by either their structure or content, such as classifying them as formal fallacies or informal fallaciesrespectively.

The classification of informal fallacies may be subdivided into categories such as linguistic, relevance through omission, relevance through example of logical fallacy in literature, and relevance through presumption. In turn, material fallacies may be placed into the more general category of informal fallacies, while formal fallacies may be clearly placed into the more precise category of logical deductive fallacies.

The conscious or habitual use of fallacies as rhetorical devices is prevalent in the desire to persuade when the focus is more on communication and eliciting common agreement rather than on the correctness of the reasoning. The effective use of a fallacy by an orator may be considered clever, but by the same token, the reasoning of that orator should be recognized as unsound, and thus the orator's claim, supported by an unsound argument, will be regarded as unfounded and dismissed.

A formal fallacy is an error in logic that can be seen in the argument's form. A propositional fallacy is an error in logic that concerns compound propositions. The following fallacies involve inferences whose correctness is not guaranteed by the behavior of those logical connectives, and hence, which are not logically guaranteed to yield true conclusions. Types of propositional fallacies:. A quantification fallacy is an error in logic where the quantifiers of the premises are in contradiction to the quantifier of the conclusion.

Types of quantification fallacies:. Syllogistic fallacies — logical fallacies that occur in syllogisms. Informal fallacies — arguments that are fallacious for reasons other than structural formal flaws and usually require example of logical fallacy in literature of the argument's content.

Faulty generalization — reach a conclusion from weak premises. Unlike fallacies of relevance, in fallacies of defective example of logical fallacy in literature, the premises are related to the conclusions yet only weakly support the conclusions. A faulty generalization is thus produced. Questionable cause - Is a general type error with many variants. Its primary basis is the confusion of association with causation.

Either by inappropriately deducing or rejecting causation or a broader failure to properly investigate the cause of an observed effect. A red herring fallacy, one of the main subtypes of fallacies of relevance, is an error in logic where a proposition is, or is intended to be, misleading in order to make irrelevant or false inferences.

In the general case any logical inference based on fake arguments, intended to replace the lack of real arguments or to replace implicitly the subject of the discussion. Red herring — a speaker attempts to distract an audience by deviating from the topic at hand by introducing a separate argument the speaker believes is easier to speak to.

See also irrelevant conclusion. The following is a sample of books for further reading, selected for a combination of content, ease of access via the internet, and to provide an indication of published sources that interested readers may review.

The titles of some books are self-explanatory. Good books on critical thinking commonly contain sections on fallacies, and some may be listed below. From Wikipedia, example of logical fallacy in literature, the free encyclopedia. For specific popular misconceptions, see List of common misconceptions.

Main article: Formal fallacy. Main article: Informal fallacy. Lists portal Philosophy portal. Cognitive distortion List of cognitive biases List of common misconceptions List of memory biases List of paradoxes List of topics related to public relations and propaganda Map—territory relation confusing map with territory, menu with meal Mathematical fallacy Sophistical Refutationsin which Aristotle presented thirteen fallacies Straight and Crooked Thinking book.

Retrieved 10 September Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 13 June Oxford advanced learner's dictionary of current English 8th ed. Oxford [England]: Oxford University Press. Archived from the original on 27 September Toolkit For Thinking.

Archived from the original on 19 February Psychology Glossary. Retrieved In Shafer-Landau, Russ ed.

Ethical Theory: An Anthology. Blackwell Philosophy Anthologies. October Oxford University Press. The Skeptic's Dictionary. Retrieved 5 April For my purposes the desirable but only lightly defensible territory of the Motte and Bailey castle, that is to say, the Bailey, represents a philosophical doctrine or position with similar properties: desirable to its proponent but only lightly defensible, example of logical fallacy in literature.

The Motte is the defensible example of logical fallacy in literature undesired position to which one retreats when hard pressed Practical Ethics: Ethics in the News. Cardiff University. University of Oxford. Retrieved 23 May Some people have spoken of a Motte and Bailey Doctrine as being a fallacy and others of it being a matter of strategic equivocation. Strictly speaking, neither is correct.

Slate Star Codex. The motte-and-bailey The Nizkor Project. Harvard Business Review. March—April July Retrieved 6 October The Black Swan. Random House. Thou shalt not commit logical fallacies. Ramage; John C. Bean; June Johnson Pearson Education. Retrieved September 5, example of logical fallacy in literature, The Daily Bell.

Retrieved 18 February The Elements of Reasoning. Cengage Learning. Archived from the original on 13 June Compp. The most basic way to distort an issue is to deny that it exists.

This fallacy claims, 'That's just how it is. Archived from the original on February 5, Retrieved February 11, Da Capo Press — via Google Books. Bunnin, Nicholas; Yu, Jiyuan, eds. The Blackwell Dictionary of Western Philosophy. Nifty Books. Also available as an ebook. Copi, Irving M. Introduction to Logic 8th ed. Curtis, Gary N. Edward Retrieved 30 November Dowden, Bradley December 31, The Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

Fischer, David Hackett Flew, Antony A Dictionary of Philosophy.

 

15 Common Logical Fallacies and How to Spot Them

 

example of logical fallacy in literature

 

Slippery Slope Examples. Slippery Slope is a specific type of logical fallacy.A logical fallacy is a flawed argument. There are many different types of logical fallacy. Slippery slope is one example of a fallacy. It is an argument that suggests taking a minor action will . Feb 24,  · The either-or fallacy, also known as false dilemma or false dichotomy, is a type of fallacy (logically false belief) wherein a said situation has only a limited number of alternatives. But in reality, it can have more. PsycholoGenie, in this post, explains the concept of either-or fallacy, and also cites some examples to make you understand it requiread-w.ga: Vibhav Gaonkar. "A logical fallacy is a false statement that weakens an argument by distorting an issue, drawing false conclusions, misusing evidence, or misusing language." (Dave .